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Top news and views about #Environment and #Cleantech for 19 Apr 2017 #CrowdifyNews #Solar #Renewables #Wind

 

Welcome to the Crowdify digest of interesting and important news and views about Environment and Cleantech.

 

Climate Change Is Ruining Farmers’ Lives, But Only A Few Will Admit It

Climate Change Is Ruining Farmers’ Lives, But Only A Few Will Admit It

 

When Christina Carter started growing vegetables 12 years ago, she looked forward to winters because they offered her the chance to recover from the strenuous growing and harvesting seasons.

That’s no longer the case. Summers are hotter and stormier than they used to be, and fall never seems to come. A true winter also seems to be a thing of the past, but that doesn’t mean spring won’t bring the occasional surprise hailstorm.

Today, Carter, who owns and operates the Ten Mile Farm in Old Fort, North Carolina, is managing crops and dealing with repairs and maintenance to her farm year-round.

“We used to have December, January and February off,” Carter said with a laugh.

Full story at http://huff.to/2ovxQ3n

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Climate change scientists' bid to drill Everest glacier

Climate change scientists

 

Climate-change scientists are to travel to the Himalayas in a bid to become the first team to successfully drill through the world's highest glacier.

The Aberystwyth University-led group will use a drill adapted from a car wash to cut into the Khumbu glacier in the foothills of Everest.

They will work at an altitude of 5,000m (16,400ft), in the hope of finding out how climate change affects Khumbu.

Project leader Prof Bryn Hubbard said there will be "particular challenges".

Full story at http://bbc.in/2ovG0J1

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Humans on the verge of causing Earth’s fastest climate change in 50m years

Humans on the verge of causing Earth’s fastest climate change in 50m years

 

A new study published in Nature Communications looks at changes in solar activity and carbon dioxide levels over the past 420 million years. The authors found that on our current path, by mid-century humans will be causing the fastest climate change in approximately 50 million years, and if we burn all available fossil fuels, we’ll cause the fastest change in the entire 420 million year record.

The study relates to a scientific conundrum known as the “faint young sun paradox” – that early in Earth’s history, solar output was 30% less intense than it is today, and yet the planet was warm enough to have a liquid ocean. A stronger greenhouse effect due to higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere may be one explanation.

Over time, solar output has grown stronger, and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have fallen due to an effect known as “weathering” of rocks and an increase in plant life. The authors of this study found that over the past 420 million years, the slow heating of the sun and slow decline of the greenhouse effect have roughly offset each other, leading to a fairly stable long-term global climate.

Full story at http://bit.ly/2nW7w3I

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Investors Warm to ’Green Bonds’

Investors Warm to ’Green Bonds’

 

“Green bond” issuance is growing fast, part of the overall trend of do-good investments becoming more popular. And U.S. fund companies are looking to tap into investor demand for these bonds, which finance environmentally friendly projects from green infrastructure and real-estate development to energy-efficiency initiatives.

About $81 billion of green bonds were issued last year, according to the Climate Bonds Initiative, a nonprofit that promotes the debt market as a way to raise money for projects related to climate change. It expects $150 billion of green bonds to be issued this year, compared with just $3 billion were issued in 2012. These figures cover “labeled” green bonds, meaning they have been reviewed externally and meet certain definitions, including those of the Climate Bonds Initiative.

A range of private and government organizations have issued green bonds, from Apple Inc.AAPL -1.08% and Toyota Motor Corp. TM 0.40% to municipalities, New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the governments of France and Poland. They have proved popular with investors, with most of the issues oversubscribed, according to the Climate Bonds Initiative. “These are no longer niche investments,” says Neena Mishra, director of ETF research at Zacks Investment Research.

The growth of the market has sparked interest from fund companies, with the first U.S.-listed exchange-traded fund focused on green bonds—the VanEck Vectors Green Bond ETF (GRNB)—launched in March.

Full story at http://on.wsj.com/2o4YUUG

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Scientists seek holy grail of climate change in Oman's hills

Scientists seek holy grail of climate change in Oman

 

Deep in the jagged red mountains of Oman, geologists are drilling in search of the holy grail of reversing climate change: an efficient and cheap way to remove carbon dioxide from the air and oceans.

They are coring samples from one of the world's only exposed sections of the Earth's mantle to uncover how a spontaneous natural process millions of years ago transformed CO2 into limestone and marble.

As the world mobilizes to confront climate change, the main focus has been on reducing emissions through fuel efficient cars and cleaner power plants. But some researchers are also testing ways to remove or recycle carbon already in the seas and sky.

The Hellisheidi geothermal plant in Iceland injects carbon into volcanic rock. At the massive Sinopec fertilizer plant in China, CO2 is filtered and reused as fuel. In all, 16 industrial projects currently capture and store around 27 million tons of CO2, according to the International Energy Agency. That's less than 0.1 percent of global emissions — but the technology has shown promise.

Full story at http://abcn.ws/2pDD22T

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Where climate change is threatening the health of Americans

Where climate change is threatening the health of Americans

 

As President Donald Trump looks to curb the government's enforcement of climate regulations, experts are concerned about how the action might impact public health.

"The current federal political climate in the United States bodes ill for the future of the world's climate and by extension for the health of people around the world, Americans included," said Dr. Mona Sarfaty, director of the program on climate and health at George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication.

Sarfaty helped prepare a report, released last month by the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, that mapped how climate change threatens the health of people across the United States and how those threats vary by region.

Extreme temperatures and weather events, poor outdoor air quality, contaminated food and water, mosquito- and tick-borne infections, wildfires and stresses on mental health are the climate-related health risks identified in the report by practicing physicians.

Full story at http://cnn.it/2pDNI1n

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Prepared by @SydesJokes